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Social Sciences: Homeland Security

Homeland Security is the study of US efforts to prevent terrorist attacks and to reduce damages that may result from such attacks. A number of government agencies and organizations coordinate efforts in accomplishing these tasks. The academic study of Homeland Security draws on a number of disciplines at TAMUCT, including computer information systems, criminal justice, management, political science, and religious studies. To obtain a minor in Homeland Security, the student completes 18 hours of instruction from the following courses. One must select at least one course from each discipline (CIS, CJ, MGT, PLS, RS), and one must take CJK 340. Specific courses denoted by * are required.

Computer Information Systems (CISK)

441 IT Security and Risk Management
442 Computer Security Principles and Practices
446 Applied Security
448 Security Trends and Malware Analysis

Criminal Justice (C JK)

308 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems
310 Criminal Justice Supervision and Management
340* Homeland Security

Management (MGTK)

460* Emergency Management

Political Science (PLSK)

320 Terrorism and Political Violence
420 Weapons of Mass Destruction

Religious Studies (R SK)

420* Religious Terrorism

Courses

Computer Information Systems (CISK)

441 IT Security and Risk Management. This course provides an introduction to the fundamental principles and topics of Information Technology Security and Risk Management at the organizational level. Students will learn critical security principles that enable them to plan, develop and perform security tasks. The course will address hardware, software, processes, communications, applications and policies and procedures with respect to organizational IT Security and Risk Management. Lab fee $15.

442 Computer Security Principles and Practices. This course introduces the current principles and theory in the area of security. It examines the basic methods and practices of security as it affects modern business operations. This is an overview course of the concepts behind computer security. Course material will be supplemented with hands on exercises in the security laboratory. Topics covered include cryptography, authentication, access control, database security, malware, intrusion detection, firewalls, security policy and management, software and operating system security, auditing and legal aspects of cyber security. Prerequisite: CISK 441 or approval of Instructor. Lab Fee $15.

446 Applied Security. This course will validate and develop in depth hands on knowledge about the operation and defense from malware attacks. It builds on previous course work to understand rapid recovery and defense of systems from attack. Students develop knowledge about system vulnerabilities and the process of penetration of systems as a way to evaluate the security of systems. Specific topics investigated include social engineering, malware usage and identification, network tool familiarization and system hardening. Prerequisite: CISK 442 or approval of the instructor. Lab Fee $15.

448 Security Trends and Malware Analysis. This course analyzes and investigates security threats and ethical hacking methods. It takes a detailed examination of malware and virus operation. The course will also examine in detail current trends in the threat environment and the most current attack exploits. Student use a variety of methods to investigate current security threat and their mitigation. Topics include malware morphology, disassembly of malware, ethical hacking methods on systems including penetration, trends in the threats cape and methods to harden and protect systems. Student will learn research skills as they apply to the area of security. Prerequisite: CISK 446 or approval of the instructor. Lab Fee $15.

Criminal Justice (C JK)

308 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems. A study of criminal justice systems around the world. The organization, administration, and philosophy of various criminal systems will be examined, along with the cultural and historical environment in which they developed and exist.

310 Criminal Justice Supervision and Management. A study of theories and principles of supervision as applied to criminal justice agencies. Topics include organization, leadership, motivation, human resources flow, and managerial ethics. Prerequisite: Junior classification or approval of instructor.

340 Homeland Security. An in-depth study of strategic, legal, policy, operational, and organizational issues associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland from foreign and domestic terrorist threats. Topics include psychology of mass movements, terrorists' ideology, religion and terror, legal issues in homeland security, weapons of mass destruction, effective interfacing between local, state, and federal agencies, emergency management operations and dealing with mass casualties.

Management (MGTK)

460 Emergency Management. This course presents the theories, principles, and approaches to emergency management. The Philosophy of Comprehensive Emergency Management (CEM) is discussed with its four phases of preparedness, mitigation, response, and recovery. An analysis of past disasters is presented along with their attendant policy formations leading to the FEMA all hazards approach.

Political Science (PLSK)

320 Terrorism and Political Violence. A study of the causes of terrorism and other forms of political violence, with particular emphasis on measures of prevention and counter-terrorism.

420 Weapons of Mass Destruction. Examines the physical and political effects of chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons, with emphasis on issues of deterrence and arms control.

Religious Studies (R SK)

420 Religious Terrorism. Examines the religious motivations, support, and tactics behind the phenomena of domestic and foreign terrorism.