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Title IX

This webpage is a resource on how to report incidents of sexual discrimination for students, faculty, staff and visitors who are part of the Texas A&M University-Central Texas community.

What is Title IX?

Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972 prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs and activities at federally funded institutions. Title IX protects students, faculty, staff, and visitors to our campus from all forms of sex discrimination.

Under Title IX, you have the right to:

  • Work and learn in an environment free from discrimination
  • File a report, when you are ready, to the Title IX office
  • Seek academic accomodations
  • File a report with the University Police or local law enforcement
  • Obtain a "no-contact" order
  • Receive confidential counseling

Title IX Mission Statement

A&M-Central Texas does not tolerate acts of discrimination, harassment, or retaliation based on a protected class. The Office of Institutional Compliance is committed to providing and protecting equal access to A&M-Central Texas educational programs, employment programs and campus activities by supporting parties through a fair, equitable and thorough investigation and resolution process in accordance with A&M System Regulation, Civil Rights Compliance, 08.01.01.

If you have observed, become aware of, or experienced an incident that constitutes sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking based on sex, you can report the incident using one of the reporting avenues listed below.


File a Formal Complaint

Title IX requires that a complainant who is alleging sex discrimination and/or sexual harassment submit a formal complaint in order to initiate the grievance process. More information about the Title IX grievance process can be found here in our Civil Rights Compliance Rule.

File a Formal Complaint of Sexual Misconduct Under Title IX

Filing a formal complaint will initiate the grievance process related to the reported allegations which includes initiating an investigation, and/or initiating the informal resolution process, and/or the student conduct process.  


Report a Sexual Misconduct Violation

The following report form link is for complainants who wish to put the institution on notice, but do not wish to file a formal complaint: Report a violation.

Anyone who feels that they have been the victim of prohibited, sexual misconduct but does not wish to file a formal complaint can still find help. Resources are available even if an individual chooses not to file a formal complaint to law enforcement or the university.

You may use this report with the University if you are seeking support and resources such as academic accommodations or counseling under the Report a Sexual Misconduct Violation (individuals do not need to file a formal complaint to seek support and resources), and/or disciplinary remedies such as probation, suspension, or expulsion (for students), or termination of employment (for employees).

Requests from complainants to withhold any name, or a request not to investigate or seek action against the respondent, will be considered in the context of A&M-Central Texas' duty to provide a safe and nondiscriminatory work, educational, and campus environment. This may require that A&M-Central Texas take action when the complainant requests no action, such as when violence is involved, when the threat of violence exists, or when required by law, as in the case of elderly, disabled, or child abuse. A request to withhold information or not to investigate the alleged misconduct may limit the member’s ability to respond.


Find Confidential Support:

Anyone who feels that they have been the victim of prohibited, sexual misconduct but does not wish to file a formal complaint can still find help. Resources are available even if an individual chooses not to file a formal complaint to law enforcement or the university.

Confidential Reporters are required to provide general nonidentifying information as required to comply with the Clery Act, and must report to the Title IX Coordinator any type of sex-based incident made known to them, but may not include any information that would violate that person’s expectation of privacy. Exceptions to confidentiality/privacy include reports of child abuse, abuse or neglect of disabled or elderly persons, and when a party poses an imminent danger to themselves or others.

FAQs: Title IX Frequently Asked Questions

Student Resources 

Employee Resources


Mandatory Reporters

All employees are responsible for ensuring their work and educational environments are free from sex discrimination. If an employee reasonably believes that an incident constitutes sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking based on sex and that the incident is alleged to have been committed by or against a person who was a student enrolled at or an employee of the institution at the time of the incident, the employee must promptly report the incident to the member’s Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Title IX Coordinator.

All complaints should include the following to the extent possible:

  1. date(s) of the complaint and alleged incident(s);
  2. nature and description of the alleged conduct;
  3. name(s), category (employee, student, and/or third party) and title(s), if applicable, of the individual who was subjected to the alleged discriminatory conduct; and
  4. name(s), category (employee, student, and/or third party) and title(s), if applicable, of the respondent(s), if known.

Employees are mandatory reporters and must: 

Report incident to the A&M-Central Texas, Title IX Coordinator:
Michelle Zornes, 254.519.5716, mzornes@tamuct.edu.

For Complaints against Students

Report incident to A&M-Central Texas, Deputy Title IX Coordinator Associate Dean of Student Affairs, Paul York, 254.501.5909, pyork@tamuct.edu.

For Complaints against Employees

Report incident to A&M-Central Texas, Deputy Title IX Coordinator and Director of Human Resources, Tina Flores-Nevarez, 254.519.8015, t.flores@tamuct.edu.

Civil Rights Reporting Form on Canvas for Employees

Civil Rights/Title IX Reporting Form on Canvas


Information for Mandatory Reporters


What if the individual asks me not to report the information?

Often times the reporter is unaware that employees when acting in the course and scope of their employment are mandatory reporters therefore it is recommended to gently pause the reporter before or after they disclose an incident of discrimination to inform them of your duty to promptly report to a Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Title IX Coordinator or designee. Under A&M System Regulation Civil Rights Compliance, 08.01.01, an employee who is not designated as a confidential employee* must report the incident even if the individual asks you to keep his or her story confidential. If the individual decides not to share anymore information with you, you should encourage the individual to seek medical care for treatment of injuries, to preserve evidence and to seek counseling. Any information the individual gives to health practitioners in the course of treatment is confidential and no identifiable information will be shared. You should encourage (but not require) the individual to make a report to the appropriate law enforcement agency or the university Title IX Coordinator.

 

What happens if I don’t report the information?

An employee’s failure to report alleged or suspected discrimination, harassment, or related retaliation may result in disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal. Are there any exemptions to the Mandatory Reporting requirement?

Students (who are not student employees) and third parties are encouraged, but not required to report incidents of sex discrimination.

What can I tell the individual who is disclosing discrimination or harassment what to expect after a report is received?

Once a report is received from a mandatory reporter the Title IX Coordinator will reach out to the reporter to offer them resources, rights and options. The Title IX Coordinator may open a formal investigation if it appears that a University policy was violated.

To read more on how the university complies with Title IX and other federal and state civil rights laws, A&M-Central Texas has developed rules and procedures, followed by System policies that prohibit discrimination in all its forms.


Pregnant and Parenting Students

The U.S. Department of Education’s regulation implementing Title IX specifically prohibits discrimination against a student based on pregnancy, childbirth, false pregnancy, termination of pregnancy, or recovery from any of these conditions. From the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, here are some things you should know about your rights:

Classes and School Activities – TAMUCT MUST:
  • Allow you to continue participating in classes and extracurricular activities even though you are pregnant. This means that you can still participate in advanced placement and honors classes, school clubs, sports, honor societies, student leadership opportunities, and other activities, like after-school programs operated at the school.
  • Allow you to choose whether you want to participate in special instructional programs or classes for pregnant students. You can participate if you want to, but your school cannot pressure you to do so. The alternative program must provide the same types of academic, extracurricular and enrichment opportunities as your school’s regular program.
  • Allow you to participate in classes and extracurricular activities even though you are pregnant and not require you to submit a doctor’s note unless your school requires a doctor’s note from all students who have a physical or emotional condition requiring treatment by a doctor. Your school also must not require a doctor’s note from you after you have been hospitalized for childbirth unless it requires a doctor’s note from all students who have been hospitalized for other conditions.
  • Provide you with reasonable adjustments, like a larger desk, elevator access, or allowing you to make frequent trips to the restroom, when necessary because of your pregnancy.
Excused Absences and Medical Leave – TAMUCT MUST:
  • Excuse absences due to pregnancy or childbirth for as long as your doctor says it is necessary.
  • Allow you to return to the same academic and extracurricular status as before your medical leave began, which should include giving you the opportunity to make up any work missed while you were out.
  • Ensure that faculty members understand the Title IX requirements related to excused absences/medical leave. Your teacher may not refuse to allow you to submit work after a deadline you missed because of pregnancy or childbirth. If your teacher’s grading is based in part on class participation or attendance and you missed class because of pregnancy or childbirth, you should be allowed to make up the participation or attendance credits you didn’t have the chance to earn.
  • Provide pregnant students with the same special services it provides to students with temporary medical conditions. This includes homebound instruction/at-home tutoring/independent study.
Harassment – TAMUCT MUST:
  • Protect you from harassment based on sex, including harassment because of pregnancy or related conditions. Comments that could constitute prohibited harassment include making sexual comments or jokes about your pregnancy, calling you sexually charged names, spreading rumors about your sexual activity, and making sexual propositions or gestures, if the comments are sufficiently serious that it interferes with your ability to benefit from or participate in your school’s program.
Helpful Tips for Pregnant and Parenting Students:
  • Ask your school for help—meet with Deputy Title IX Coordinator, Paul York, pyork@tamuct.edu, 254.501.5909 to see how TAMUCT can support you in continuing your education. Request assistance or academic accommodations related to pregnancy or parenting here: https://www.tamuct.edu/student-affairs/pregnant-and-parenting-students.html
  • Keep notes about your pregnancy-related absences, any instances of harassment and your interactions with school officials about your pregnancy, and immediately report problems to your school’s Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, counselor, or other staff.
  • If you feel you are being discriminated against you because you are pregnant or parenting you may file a complaint at https://cm.maxient.com/reportingform.php?TAMUCentralTexas&layout_id=4
  • If you feel you are being is discriminated against you because you are pregnant or parenting you may file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights (OCR) at Office for Civil Rights, at (800) 421-3481 or ocr@ed.gov, even if you have not filed a complaint with your school. If you file with OCR, make sure you do so within 180 days of when the discrimination took place. If you wish, you may fill out a complaint form online at at http://www.ed.gov/ocr/complaintintro.html.

Make a Report to Law enforcement:

If you are seeking criminal penalties (such as incarceration or sex offender registration), you should file a report with the relevant law enforcement agency.

Individuals have the option of notifying both on-campus law enforcement and local law enforcement authorities to report sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence or stalking. Below is a list of local law enforcement agencies. Reports should be filed with the agency where the incident occurred.

Make a Report to Law Enforcement

Method Contact
Dial 911 Report emergencies or non-emergency criminal violations from a public area, university building or cell phone
Dial (254) 501-5800 Report non-emergency requests for police or security services or information
Emergency Assistance Call Boxes Immediate connection to TAMUCT Police
Off-Campus Police Departments (254) 501-8830 Killeen Police Department
(254) 547-8222 Copperas Cove Police Department
(254) 953-5420 Harker Heights Police Department
(254) 933-5840 Belton Police Department
(254) 298-5500 Temple Police Department
(254) 698-6334 Nolanville Police Department
In Person Contact a university police officer: Founders Hall Welcome Center Desk or FH 103 during normal business hours
Online Email: dps@tamuct.edu
Anonymous Report information about a crime anonymously at https://www.tamuct.edu/police/silentwitness.html
Warrior Shield Phone app that connects you with police through your phone. Learn more.

Your Rights and Other Resource Links

Texas A&M University-Central Texas students, staff and faculty have a certain rights under Title IX. Employees and students have a right to: 

  • - Work and learn in an environment free from discrimination
  • - File a report, when you are ready to the Title IX Office -Seek academic or employment accommodations
  • - File a report with the university police or local law enforcement
  • - Obtain a no-contact order
  • - Receive confidential support and counseling 

A complainant and respondent have certain resources, rights, and options available under the Title IX resolution process.

The resource links below provide detailed information of those rights and resources.


Glossary of Terms

Discrimination
–a materially adverse action or actions that intentionally or unintentionally excludes one from full participation in, denies the benefits of, or affects the terms and conditions of employment or access to educational or institutional programs because of an individual’s race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, genetic information, veteran status, sexual orientation, gender identity, or any other classification protected by federal, state, or local law. Discrimination includes harassment (based on both hostile environment and quid pro quo) and retaliation based on a legally protected category.
Dating Violence
– violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim. (a) The existence of such a relationship will be determined based on the reporting party's statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (b) For the purposes of this definition: (1) Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse. (2) Dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence. [34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(10)] Dating violence is explicitly prohibited under this regulation. Aiding another in the commission of dating violence is also prohibited under this regulation. Dating violence is a form of sexual harassment or sex-based misconduct.
Domestic Violence
– a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by: (a) a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim; (b) a person with whom the victim shares a child in common; (c) a person who is cohabitating with, or has cohabitated with, the victim as a spouse or intimate partner; (d) a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred; or (e) any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person's acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred. [34 U.S.C. 12291(a)(8)] Domestic violence is explicitly prohibited under this regulation. Aiding another in the commission of domestic violence is also prohibited under this regulation. Domestic violence is a form of sexual harassment or sex-based misconduct.
Retaliation
– intimidation, threats, coercion, or discrimination against any individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured under civil rights laws and regulations, or because the individual has made a report or complaint, testified, assisted, or participated or refused to participate in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or hearing. The exercise of rights protected under the First Amendment does not constitute prohibited retaliation, nor does the filing of a mandatory report as required by Section 2.1 of this regulation. In addition, a university official who files a mandatory report or charges an individual with making a materially false statement in the course of an investigation has not engaged in prohibited retaliation. Aiding another in the commission of retaliation is also prohibited at A&M-Central Texas.
Sexual assault
– an offense that meets the definition of rape, fondling, incest or statutory rape as used in the FBl's Uniform Crime Reporting system. A sex offense is any sexual act directed against another person, without the consent of the victim, including instances in which the victim is incapable of giving consent. These offenses are defined as:
  • Rape:
    The penetration, no matter how slight, of the vagina or anus with any body part or object, or oral penetration by a sex organ of another person, without the consent of the victim. Fondling: The touching of the private body parts of another person for the purpose of sexual gratification, without the consent of the victim, including instances where the victim is incapable of giving consent because of his/her age or because of his/her temporary or permanent mental incapacity.
  • Incest:
    Sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
  • Statutory Rape:
    Sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. Sexual assault is explicitly prohibited under this regulation. Aiding another in the commission of sexual assault is also prohibited under this regulation. Sexual assault is a form of sexual harassment or sex-based misconduct.
Sex-based misconduct
– unwelcome conduct on the basis of sex that is severe, persistent, or pervasive enough to create a work, educational, or campus living environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, abusive, or offensive. Sex-based misconduct is explicitly prohibited at A&M –Central Texas. Aiding another in the commission of sex-based misconduct is also prohibited at A&M –Central Texas. Sex-based includes, but is not limited to, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking based on sex.
Sexual exploitation
– a situation in which an individual(s) takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his or her own advantage or benefit, or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited. For example, sexual exploitation could include such actions as secretly videotaping sexual activity, voyeurism, sexually-based stalking, invasion of sexual privacy, exposing one’s genitals or causing another to expose one’s genitals, and knowingly exposing another person to a sexually transmitted infection or disease. Sexual exploitation is a form of sex-based misconduct.
Sexual harassment
– a form of sex discrimination. Unwelcome conduct on the basis of sex (of a sexual nature or otherwise): (1) by an employee of the member who conditions the provision of an aid, benefit, or service of the member on an individual’s participation in that unwelcome sexual conduct; (2) determined by a reasonable person to be so severe and pervasive and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the member’s education program or activity; or (3) sexual assault or dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking based on sex.
Stalking
– engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to: (a) fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; or (b) suffer substantial emotional distress. 08.01.01 Civil Rights Compliance Page 6 of 29 For the purposes of this definition: (a) Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about a person, or interferes with a person's property. (b) Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. (c) Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling. [34 CFR 668.46(a)] Stalking is explicitly prohibited at A&M –Central Texas. Aiding another in the commission of stalking is also prohibited under this regulation. Stalking based on sex is a form of sexual harassment or sex-based misconduct.
Supportive measures
– non-disciplinary, non-punitive individualized services offered as appropriate, as reasonably available, and without fee or charge to the complainant or the respondent before or after the filing of a formal complaint or where no formal complaint has been filed. Such measures are designed to restore or preserve equal access to the member’s education program or activity without unreasonably burdening the other party, including measures designed to protect the safety of all parties or the member’s educational or work environment, or deter sexual harassment. Supportive measures may include counseling, extensions of deadlines or other course-related adjustments, modifications of work or class schedules, campus escort services, mutual restrictions on contact between the parties, changes in work or housing locations, leaves of absence, increased security and monitoring of certain areas of the campus or workplace, and other similar measures.
Quid pro quo sexual harassment
– “this” for “that”; i.e., unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors or other verbal, nonverbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, the submission to or rejection of which may result in an adverse educational or employment action. Quid pro quo sexual harassment is explicitly prohibited under this regulation. Aiding another in the commission of quid pro quo sexual harassment is also prohibited under this regulation.

Title IX Designated Officials

The Title IX Coordinator has primary responsibility for coordinating efforts for notification, investigation, resolution, implementation of and supportive measures, and monitoring the educational environment and workplace to stop, remedy, and prevent discrimination on the basis of sex.

For reporting incidents or making inquiries regarding discrimination based on sex, you may contact the Title IX Coordinator. Anyone who feels that they have been the victim of prohibited sexual misconduct conduct is encouraged to bring it to the attention of the University’s Title IX Compliance Coordinator, Michelle Zornes. She is empowered to provide supportive remedies and academic adjustments to all individuals involved in these situations and to protect the safety of the campus community through these measures.

Ms. Michelle Zornes



Students, faculty, staff, visitors, and applicants for employment or admission should notify the appropriate Designated Official below who handles alleged violations perpetrated by students, faculty, staff, and visitors.

Designated Official for Title IX Complaints against Students



Designated Official for Title IX Complaints against Faculty, Staff and Visitors

Photo of Tina Flores-Nevarez

Education and Training

Course materials used to train individuals involved in the investigation and resolution of Title IX allegations at A&M-Central Texas:

Request Title IX or Green Dot Training: Titleix@tamuct.edu


FAQ's - Title IX Frequently Asked Questions


  1. How do I file a report of sex discrimination or sexual misconduct?
  2. What types of conduct can I report?
  3. What is the difference between civil rights and sexual misconduct? Why does student conduct handle some cases?
  4. Is there a time limit for reporting?
  5. What happens after I make a report?
  6. What are my rights as a Complainant during this investigation?
  7. If I want to report my professor or my boss, can they retaliate against me?
  8. What is an Academic Adjustment or an Interim Support?

  9. Complainants and Respondents

  10. How do “No Contact” Restrictions work?
  11. Where can I get counseling or other support services?
  12. What is the difference between a criminal investigation and a University Investigation?
  13. Can I talk with other people about what is going on?
  14. Where do I get a Rape Kit?
  15. How long do investigations typically take?
  16. What is the standard of proof?
  17. Can I bring a friend or my attorney to the investigation interview?

Answers

  1. How do I file a report of sex discrimination or sexual misconduct? You can make a report (File a Report) with the University, law enforcement or anonymously.

  2. What types of conduct can I report?
  3. The Office of Institutional Compliance (OIC) investigates allegations of civil rights violations at A&M-Central Texas. This includes harassment based on a protected class, discrimination based on a protected class, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking. OIC also investigates allegations of retaliation for reporting or participating in the investigation of any of the above behaviors.

    At A&M-Central Texas, the list of protected classes includes: race, color, religion, national origin, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, age, ability, veteran status, and genetic information. Harassment or discrimination based on any of these classes can be reported to the Office of Institutional Compliance.

  4. What is the difference between civil rights and sexual misconduct? Why does student conduct handle some cases?
  5. The Office of Institutional Compliance (OIC) is charged with investigating violations of civil rights. Sexual misconduct becomes a civil rights violation when it is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it creates a work or educational environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or abusive. The determination of whether an environment is “hostile” must be based on all of the circumstances, which may include the frequency of the conduct, the nature and severity of the conduct, whether the conduct was physically threatening or humiliating, and the mental or emotional effect of the conduct on the individual(s) subjected to the alleged harassment. An “intimidating or abusive” environment exists when the conduct interferes with, limits, or deprives an individual from participating in or benefiting from the University’s educational, employment, and/or campus experience (including participation in University programs, activities, or benefits).

    Sometimes, a behavior may be unacceptable behavior for members of the A&M-Central Texas community, but may also not reach the standards required by law to be a civil rights violation. To ensure that this kind of behavior does not go unaddressed, OIC may delegate the investigation and sanctioning of unprofessional or inappropriate conduct of a sexual nature to other university administrators, such as a Department Head or the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.

    Prohibited Conduct

    Prohibited Conduct is a phrase used to describe illegal discrimination or harassment based on another person’s protected characteristics or statuses. Retaliating against someone who reports discrimination or harassment, or participates in an investigation of prohibited conduct, is also included in the definition.

    Some forms of gender or sex-based misconduct are considered Prohibited Conduct if such behavior is so severe, persistent, or pervasive that it unreasonably affects an individual’s employment, work or educational performance, or creates an intimidating or hostile work, educational, or campus living environment. Please see A&M-Central Texas Rule 08.01.01.D1 for more information about Prohibited Conduct.

    Although every case is individually evaluated based on the facts and circumstances specific to that case, examples of behaviors that would likely constitute Prohibited Conduct could include:

    • Firing an employee because he is a new father who plans to take 12 weeks of FMLA leave to bond with his newborn child.
    • Repeatedly pressuring another person for a date or for specific sexual acts (i.e. not taking “No” for an answer).
    • Making serious threats of violence towards a person that you are dating or living with.
    • Penetrating another person without consent.
    • Posting an intimate picture of your ex-girlfriend on social media without consent.
    • Asking a student enrolled in your class if they would trade sex for an “A” in the class.
    • Failing to hire an applicant because she is a transgender woman.
    • Having sex with someone without disclosing an STI (sexually transmitted infection) and giving them the opportunity to decline to have sex with you.
    • Denying an employee a promotion because he is gay or straight.
    • Paying an employee a lower salary because he is disabled.

    The difference between Prohibited Conduct and Inappropriate Conduct Related to Sex or Gender


    Inappropriate Conduct Related to Sex or Gender is unwelcome, unprofessional or inappropriate sexual or gender-based conduct that is not severe, persistent, or pervasive enough to meet the definition of “prohibited conduct.” Even though such behavior is not a violation of Texas A&M System Regulation 08.01.01, it may be addressed under other University Rules. OIC handles the investigation and resolution of complaints of “prohibited conduct” while “inappropriate conduct related to sex or gender” is usually addressed by other University administrators.

    Examples of conduct which would likely be classified as Inappropriate Conduct Related to Sex or Gender:

    • A professor tells a single joke in class that is mildly offensive to a particular gender identity. While this conduct is unprofessional, it is not severe, persistent, or pervasive enough to interfere with the learning environment. OIC would likely refer this complaint to the Head of the Department for resolution.
    • Your lab partner “accidentally” brushes your hand or thigh as they walk past you, but you believe that the touching was intentional. Even though this conduct is inappropriate, it is not severe, persistent, or pervasive enough to interfere with a student’s ability to conduct an experiment. OIC would likely refer this complaint to the Division of Student Affairs for resolution under the Student Conduct Rules.
    • You have told a co-worker that you are not interested in pursuing a romantic relationship. One day, the co-worker finds you alone in the break room, eating your lunch. The co-worker leans over and brushes the top of your head with his lips. While this behavior is unprofessional and unwelcome, it is not likely to be severe, persistent, or pervasive enough to interfere with your work performance. OIC would likely refer this complaint to Human Resources for resolution.

  6. Is there a time limit for reporting? No. You may report discrimination based on sex or gender, sexual harassment, sexual assault, sexual exploitation, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking at any time. However, if the alleged Respondent has graduated or is no longer employed with A&M-Central Texas, OIC’s response to the report may be limited.

  7. What happens after I make a report? You will be contacted by the University Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Title IX Coordinator, or designee who will invite you to a meeting where they can go over all of your rights, resources, and options. You will be given the opportunity to request either a formal resolution, informal resolution, or no resolution to your report.

  8. What are my rights as a Complainant during this investigation? Download your Rights Resources and Options

  9. If I want to report my professor or my boss, can they retaliate against me? If someone retaliates against you because you made a report or participated in an investigation, you may file a complaint against them for retaliation. Retaliation includes job reprimands, removal from a team or activity, poor grades, negative evaluations, threats, harassment, or other adverse actions.

  10. What is an Academic Adjustment or an Interim Support?
    Going through an investigation as either a Complainant or a Respondent is very stressful. OIC and the Division of Student Affairs can often assist with postponing a test, moving your work location, dropping a class after a Q drop date, or moving you to a different section of the same class. OIC and the Division of Student Affairs can also support you by issuing a “No Contact” restriction so that you and the other party do not talk to each other during the investigation.

  11. Complainants and Respondents


  12. How do “No Contact” Restrictions work?
  13. Division of Student Affairs can issue a “No Contact” restriction at the request of either the Complainant or the Respondent. Once both parties have been notified of the “No Contact” restriction, all communication between the parties should cease until the restriction has been lifted. Asking another person to communicate with the other party will also be considered a violation of the restriction. Violating the “No Contact” order may result in charges of violating the Code of Student Conduct being issued by the Office of Student Conduct.

    If you are in a public place (such as the library), and the other person arrives at the same location, you should avoid each other. If you are uncomfortable being at the same location with the other person, you should leave the premises.

    During an investigation of allegations of sex-based violence or non-consensual penetration of another person, the Associate Dean of Student Affairs makes case-by-case determinations about a student’s eligibility to participate in extracurricular activities, including student organizations.

  14. Where can I get counseling or other support services?
    Going through an investigation as either a Complainant or a Respondent is very stressful. Individuals may wish to seek on-campus or off-campus confidential support services, including counseling, and/or medical services.

  15. What is the difference between a criminal investigation and a University Investigation?

    During a criminal investigation, investigators gather evidence in order to determine whether someone broke the law. If a person is found guilty of breaking a law, a judge assigns criminal penalties (like incarceration or sex offender registration). A Complainant seeking criminal penalties files a report with the relevant law enforcement agency.

    Investigations conducted by the Department of Civil Rights and Equity Investigations at A&M-Central Texas are administrative investigations, not criminal investigations. During a University investigation, investigators gather evidence in order to make a conclusion about whether a System regulation or University rule or policy has been broken. If a violation is found, a University administrator issues sanctions such as probation, termination of employment, suspension, or expulsion. Please consult the University’s Title IX Sanctioning Matrix for an explanation the University’s sanctions. A Complainant seeking University sanctions for student misconduct should file a report (link formal report) with the University.

    An individual is not required to report an issue to law enforcement or the University, but individuals are encouraged to report to either or both. A criminal investigation and a University investigation may occur concurrently.


  16. Can I talk with other people about what is going on?
    In order to protect the privacy of all who are involved in the investigation process (including complainants, respondents, and witnesses), and to protect the integrity of the investigation process, we ask that you keep information related to the investigation private. You are not prohibited from speaking with others about what is going on; however, you should be careful to not engage in conduct that could be perceived as retaliation.

  17. Where do I get a Rape Kit?
    Baylor Scott & White Medical Center in Temple, 2401 S. 31st St Temple, TX 76508, 254-724-2111 is the community’s designated forensic nursing facility offering a 24/7 program with trained Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE) and a forensic unit that provides detailed physical examinations, evidence collection, and expert testimony. Go to the hospital’s emergency room and request to be seen by a SANE nurse. A forensic examination can also be performed for victims of domestic violence

  18. How long do investigations typically take?
    Office of Institutional Compliance usually completes an investigation within 30 to 60 business days. Many factors, such as the complexity of the investigation, the availability of witnesses, or the availability of investigative staff can make the investigation take longer. We will keep you reasonably notified of delays, and you can call OIC at any time for a status update.

  19. What is the standard of proof? The standard of proof used in Title IX Cases is the “preponderance of the evidence” standard. Preponderance of the evidence means that, based on the evidence, the allegation is more likely than not to have occurred. This standard is different that the “beyond a reasonable doubt,” which is a much higher standard of proof that is used in criminal court.

  20. Can I bring a friend or my attorney to the investigation interview? You have the right to choose an advisor to be present with you at any point during the investigation and resolution process, including your interview with the Investigator. Your advisor may be any person selected by you, including legal counsel. The advisor’s participation will be limited to the role of an observer, although the advisor may request a break at any point to give you advice. The advisor cannot be called as a witness once they have assumed the role of advisor. Any fees charged by an advisor will be paid by the party that brings the advisor.

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