Hao-Min Chen Profile

Photo of Dr. Hao-Min Chen

Dr. Hao-Min Chen View CV

  • Department: College of Education
  • Assistant Professor
  • Room: WH-318j

Dr. Hao-Min Chen received her Ph.D. in Human Development and Family Science with Marriage and Family Therapy Emphasis, The University of Georgia; and her M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy, Syracuse University. Her research interests are diversity and marriage and family therapy. She has taught classes at undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral levels. Courses taught in MFT programs include Pre-Practicum, Practicum, Advanced Practicum, Diversity and the Family, Law and Ethics, MFT Assessments, and Doctoral Dissertation Supervision.  

Selected Publications  

Chen, H., & Lewis, D. C. (2017). The role of Chinese grandparents in adult children’s parenting practices in the United States. In K. M. Quek & S. S. Fang (Eds.), Transition and change in collectivist family life: Strategies for clinical practice with Asian Americans (pp. 57-66). AFTA SpringerBriefs in Family Therapy. Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

Quek, K. & Chen, H. (2017). Family Therapy in Chinese Culture and Context: Lessons from Supervising Therapists-in-Training in China. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal. First Online: 08 February 2017. DOI: 10.1007/s10591-016-9401-y

Chen, H. & Lewis, D. C. (2016). A changing relationship: Visiting Chinese grandparents and their adult children in the United. Journal of Ethnographic & Qualitative Research,11, 87–98. ISSN: 1935-3308.

Chen, H., & Lewis, D. C. (2015). Chinese grandparents’ involvement in their adult children’s parenting practices in the United States. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 37(1), 58-71.

Lee, B., M., Kozak, M. S., Nancoo, C. P., Chen, H., & Middendorf, K (2013). Exploring dominant discourses: Creating spaces to find voices and cultural identity. Journal of Cultural Diversity, 20 (1), 21.

Chen, H., & Lewis, D. C. (2011). Approaching the “resistant:” Exploring East Asian international students’ perceptions of therapy and help-seeking behavior before and after they arrived in the United States. Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal, 33(3), 310-323.